Linked Double Crochet (LDC) Tutorial

The linked double crochet is a double crochet stitch that links to the previous double crochet. The result is a more closed appearance than the regular double crochet gives.

Here are the 6 easy steps to making the linked double crochet (ldc) and an example of the perfect pattern to use it on.

Linked Double Crochet (LDC) Tutorial 

 

Step 1:  Insert hook in horizontal bar of previous double crochet. (this can be a regular double crochet or a linked double crochet)

 

Linked Double Crochet (LDC) - Step 1

 

 

Step 2:  Yarn over (yo) and pull up a loop (2 loops on hook).

 

Linked Double Crochet (LDC) - Step 2

 

Step 3:  Insert hook in the next stitch of your previous row (the row you should be working stitches into).

 

Linked Double Crochet (LDC) - Step 3

 

Step 4:  Yo and pull up a loop. (Note: This photo doesn’t show, but you should be pulling up your loop to the height of your current stitch.)

 

Linked Double Crochet (LDC) tutorial - Step 4

 

Step 5:  Yo and pull through 2 loops on hook. (2 loops remain)

 

Linked Double Crochet (LDC) - Step 5

 

Step 6:  Yo and pull through remaining 2 loops on hook. The Linked Double Crochet (LDC) is now complete.

 

Linked Double Crochet (LDC) - Step 6

 

 

Linked Double Crochet (LDC) tutorial by Ambassador Crochet.

 

Projects it’s good for

 

The finished product is a fully closed set of stitches that will resemble a solid fabric without the bulk of tight stitches.

This stitch is perfect if you’re looking for something that drapes more like a fabric – instead of the usual lacy (or holey as my hubby says) project. I used this in my American Flag afghan because I wanted it to have the look of a solid fabric, and I succeeded! (Pattern will be released Friday, April 28, 2017)

American Flag afghan crochet pattern using LDC. - crochet pattern and tutorial by Ambassador Crochet.

 

 

Happy Crocheting!

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How to Add Fringe to Your Crochet Project

Do you ever just want to add a finishing touch to your crochet project? Fringe goes on just about anything. Scarves & cowls, purses & bags, skirts, and so much more. Below I will show you how to add fringe to any crochet project in 4 simple steps.

How to Add Fringe to Your Crochet Project in 5 Simple Steps

 

How to Add Fringe
in 5 Easy Steps

 

Step 1: Cut your fringe to slightly more than double the fringe length you need. For my Oakley Fringe Cowl the finished fringe length was 5″. I cut each piece to 12″.

Step 2: Hold group of fringe pieces together and fold in half.

 

How to Add Fringe to Your Crochet Project in 5 Simple Steps

 

Step 3: Using a crochet hook, pull loop at top of fringe through spot in project where you would like your fringe placed.

 

How to Add Fringe to Your Crochet Project - Step 3

 

Step 4: Pull group fringe ends through loop.

 

How to Add Fringe to Your Crochet Project - Step 4

 

Step 5: Gently tighten and secure without pulling fringe away from project – which could create an unintended space/hole.

 

How to Add Fringe to Your Crochet Project - Step 5

 

Repeat Steps 1 – 5 until fringe is placed as closely or spaced out as you need it to be.

It’s as simple as that! You can add it to anything to give your project a different look or style. What kinds of things do you add fringe to?

Happy Crocheting!

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Tunisian Sampler Scarf CAL Links

My Tunisian Sampler Scarf CAL is one of my most read and pinned series of posts. The project was a way to learn Tunisian crochet, or even explore some new Tunisian stitches you’ve never tried before. It continues to be wildly popular – thank you Pinterest! But there is one question that seems to be asked more than any other and that is, “Where can I find all the sampler scarf posts?” I’m not sure why, but randomly my site won’t give you all the posts when you do a “Tunisian” search, so I thought I would put them all in one handy spot to save you time.

 

Tunisian Sampler Scarf

Here is a list of all the tutorials. Just click on each link to take you to that post.

CAL Intro

Part 1 – Tunisian Simple Stitch (tss)

Part 2 – Tunisian Purl Stitch (tps)

Part 3 – Tunisian Knit Stitch (tks)

Part 4 – Basketweave 

Part 5 – Tunisian Double Stitch (tds)

Part 6 – Puff Stitch

Part 7 – Openwork Pattern

Part 8 – Slanted Fabric Pattern

Part 9 – Berry Stitch

Part 10 – Net Stitch

Part 11 – Honecomb Stitch Pattern

Part 12 – Lattice Pattern

Finishing Row – sc bind off

I hope this will save you some time. As always, if you have any questions please let me know.

Happy Crocheting!

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Cheap Yarn Tote Solution

I’ve been planning this fairly big project, that will by my best guess, have at least 4 colors going at any given time. I have project bags coming out the wazoo (Is that even a word? lol) but not one of them is made for a project with color changes.  I’m sure you’ve seen the ones I’m referring to. They have holes for the strand to come through. They are great for projects that use multiple colors because they keep your yarn from getting tangled around the other colors. But I already have tons of project bags and actually dreaded spending money on another one.

I came up with this very easy solution, and was asked how I did it, so I thought I would share for anyone else interested. (I also have the supplies to make 3 more if anyone is interested in having me make them one.)

How to Make a Yarn Tote

Supplies:

  • 2 X 4 – will prevent any dents in your floor. 
  • Large Eyelet Kit (grommets)
  • Scissors
  • Hammer
  • Chisel
  • Plastic Yarn Bag – any thicker plastic bag will work.

I used a clear plastic yarn bag I already had, but you could probably even use those ‘green’ totes you buy in the store. I started out using the chisel to put a hole in the bag. By the time I was done I was actually just using the chisel to ‘mark’ where I wanted the hole, then I took the scissors and actually cut the hole out. Try not to make your hole any bigger than the grommet post. The directions on how to install the grommet are right on the package. Super easy. I was done the entire bag (8 yarn holes; 4 on each side) in less than 20 min.

homemade yarn tote project bag

I already had the bag, so all I had to do was purchase the grommets. They were $7.99 before I used a 40% off coupon. So the total cost of the project was less than $5. Not bad! Now I’m ready to begin my project!

Happy Crocheting!

 

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Alternative To The Magic Ring

If you found this post because you’re having difficulty working the magic circle, I have 2 suggestions that may help.

1)  DON’T GIVE UP!  You can do it.  I tell my girls all the time, “Practice makes perfect.”

2)  Here is a simple alternative I used until I took the time to master the magic ring.

ch2,

work all your stitches in the second ch from the hook. Do not count the 1st ch you skipped as a stitch.

Here’s what they look like side by side.

 

As far as the center of the circle….there isn’t much difference in the space it leaves, but it does make a slight difference in the size of the circle.  Just make sure you check your gauge to make sure the rest of your project will work to the right size.

Happy Crocheting!

 

 

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How To Make A Crochet Magic Ring

There is definitely a benefit to using a crochet magic ring, or magic circle, over the traditional beginning chain where you slip stitch into a ring.  What is that benefit?  There will be no space in the center of your project.  It will completely “seal” and leave no hole.

Here are the steps to making the magic ring.  It may take some practice, so don’t give up!

Magic Ring Tutorial 

Step 1:  Begin by making a backwards “J” with the end of your yarn.

How to Crochet Magic Ring by Ambassador Crochet - Step by Step Photo Tutorial for learning the magic ring, also know as the magic circle.

Step 2:  Cross end of yarn behind your yarn coming from the skein.

How to Crochet Magic Ring by Ambassador Crochet - Step by Step Photo Tutorial for learning the magic ring, also know as the magic circle.

Step 3:  At this point you will need to pinch/hold the yarn together where they cross.

How to Crochet Magic Ring by Ambassador Crochet - Step by Step Photo Tutorial for learning the magic ring, also know as the magic circle.

Step 4:  Let yarn from skein fall behind loop. Insert hook and pull yarn through your ring.

How to Crochet Magic Ring by Ambassador Crochet - Step by Step Photo Tutorial for learning the magic ring, also know as the magic circle.

 

Step 5:  Pull loop all the way through, and up to top of ring. (this may be the part that feels the most awkward, and takes some practice)

How to Crochet Magic Ring by Ambassador Crochet - Step by Step Photo Tutorial for learning the magic ring, also know as the magic circle.

 

Step 6:  Using your middle finger (or any finger that is comfortable) continue to hold the loop you just made, to the top of the ring.  You can now let go of the ring with your left hand, where the 2 ends cross.

How to Crochet Magic Ring by Ambassador Crochet - Step by Step Photo Tutorial for learning the magic ring, also know as the magic circle.

 

Step 7:   Chain 1 for sc & hdc patterns.  Chain 2 for dc patterns.

How to Crochet Magic Ring by Ambassador Crochet - Step by Step Photo Tutorial for learning the magic ring, also know as the magic circle.

 

Step 8:  Crochet as many stitches in the ring as your pattern calls for.

How to Crochet Magic Ring by Ambassador Crochet - Step by Step Photo Tutorial for learning the magic ring, also know as the magic circle.

 

Step 9:  Pull yarn end to seal circle.

How to Crochet Magic Ring by Ambassador Crochet - Step by Step Photo Tutorial for learning the magic ring, also know as the magic circle.

 

If something doesn’t make sense, or if you have any questions, just let me know.  It takes some practice, but you’ll get it!

Happy Crocheting!

 

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(DC, FPdc) in next stitch

This is the main increase stitch I use for my Textured Slouchy Beret, and I’ve had enough questions about it, so here is a tutorial.  Hopefully this will help, but if you still have questions don’t hesitate to ask.

(DC, FPdc) in next dc means this….

You are going to dc in the next dc, but you are also going to FPdc around the stitch you just did your dc in.  Here is a breakdown of the steps.

1)  yo, insert hook into next stitch

2)  yo, pull up a loop

3)  yo, pull through 2 loops on hook

4)  yo, pull through last 2 loops on hook (dc made)

dc completed

The next picture shows you the dc you just completed,  and shows you where you will be doing your FPdc.

5)  yo, insert hook from front to back behind post indicated above.

6)  yo, pull up a loop

7)  yo, pull  through 2 loops on hook

9)  yo, pull through last 2 loops on hook (FPdc completed)

I hope this helps.  And again, if you still have questions, don’t hesitate to ask.

Happy Crocheting! 

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Stranding – Using Multiple Colors In Your Crochet Project

This photo tutorial is for use with my American Flag beanie, or any other project, where you need to incorporate more than one color into your work.  There are 2 seperate methods of color changing, but I’ll be showing you stranding method.

STEP 1:  You have just changed colors. You should now be holding the unused color behind your project, but above the color you are crocheting with (the strand that comes from the skein).  (fig.1)

Fig. 1

STEP 2:  You will crochet your stitch as normal, but make sure your unused color gets crocheted into the stitch, attaching it to your project.  Fig.2, Fig.3, & Fig.4 show various pictures of what each step of the stitch will look like.  

 Fig.2

Fig.3

Fig.4

STEP 3:  Continue this pattern, carrying your unused color, until it is time to change back to the yarn you have been stranding.  When you are ready to change colors it will be right there waiting for you.  

TWO WORDS OF CAUTION: 

1)  You will want to make sure you strand your floating color behind your work.  If you carry it across the top (or in front) it will show through your project. 

2)  You will need to have some consistency in the tension of the yarn you are stranding.  If you pull too tightly it may pucker your project.  If you don’t pull it taut it may come through your work.

STEP 4:  Continue this pattern, carrying your unused color, until it is time to change back to the yarn you have been stranding.  When you are ready to change colors it will be right there waiting for you.  

Figure 5 shows the back side of the work.  The color changes are well hidden on the inside of the hat.



Fig.5
It may take a little bit of practice, but try it.  You can do some amazing things when you work with multiple colors.  
Happy Crocheting!

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How to Fix a Tilting or Twisting Granny Square

>Have you ever made a granny afghan, and at some point in the process it starts to look “tilted” or “twisted”?  The picture below shows this gorgeous afghan from Thornberry.  If you look closely it has a slight tilt to the center of the square.  This may not bother some, and personally I think this afghan is gorgeous, but it may drive other crocheters nuts. 

Granny afghan from Thornberry
Here’s an example from free-crochet-stitch.com

If you’re one of those who does not want your granny square to do this, here’s a simple solution.  Turn your work after every row.  Ex: Rows 1, 3, and 5 will be right side rows.  Rows 2, 4, and 6 will be wrong side rows.  Try it out and see if it works.  The other benefit to turning your work is that there will technically no longer be a right side and a wrong side to your work.

Of course, there are some who are intentionally trying for the tilted look.  That’s a totally different post, because there is actually a pattern to create that look!

Happy Crocheting!

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How to Fasten Off Your Crochet Project

Have you ever had the perfect crochet project, that has no border, and you come to the end where it says Fasten Off and you cringe because you know you won’t be able to hide it?  Or, have you been told you should not use a knot to tie off your yarn? Here’s a way to finish without a knot and make it invisible, and give it a professional finish.

Pull up a 6″ loop and cut the end. 
Pull out the end still attached to the skein.
Take your needle and insert it into your second stitch, from where you ended, and pull the yarn through.
Now you are going to take your needle and go back through the center of the stitch you ended with.
DONE! Make sure you tie in your ends as usual.
Let me know if you have any questions.

Happy Crocheting!

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