Washcloth, Tawashi & Dishcloth Patterns Roundup

We’re coming up on craft fair season, which means it’s time to make and restock your crochet projects. This year I’m going with some smaller items, so I thought I’d do a roundup of crochet patterns that would make perfect craft fair projects to sell. As I started to gather some patterns I realized there are a ton, so I decided to make it into a 2 part series. This week features washcloth, tawashi, & dishcloth patterns.

 

Craft Fair Projects - Part 1 - Tawashi & Dishcloth Roundup

 

Washcloth, Tawashi, & Dishcloth Patterns

 

  1. Gift Labels Printable
  2. Tawashi
  3. Washcloth Pattern
  4. Dish Scrubbie by Cuddle Me Beanies
  5. Waffle Washcloth
  6. Fun & Fabulous Dishcloths Set of 5 (paid)
  7. Happy Nature Dishcloths (paid)
  8. Bubble Towel Top by Crafting Friends Design
  9. Spa Washcloth Set by Crochet by Sia

 

I also have quite a few dishcloth patterns available, but my most popular dishcloth pattern is the Ball Stitch Dishcloth that has little nubs crocheted right in so you can scrub with them.

 

crochet dishcloth patterns - free ball stitch pattern by Ambassador Crochet

 

 

If you want to have a successful craft fair, check out Totally Snappy’s post. She’s got some great tips on what you can make, how to set up your craft booth, and more. Even if you’re a seasoned craft fair vendor this is a great refresher article.

I personally don’t do a lot of craft fairs – mostly because of time – so I’d love any additional advice or tips you have to give me.

 

Happy Crocheting!

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Baby Heartbeat Reversible Afghan Crochet Pattern

Everyone loves babies, and if you’ve ever heard a baby heartbeat through the fetal doppler it’s one of the most amazing sounds ever. After this baby afghan was designed a customer said they looked like the heartbeat symbols on a heart rate monitor, and so it’s name was born.

 

Baby Heartbeat

Reversible Baby Afghan Crochet Pattern

 

*This post contains affiliate links, which means that I may receive a small commission (at no cost to you) if you subscribe or purchase something through the links provided. Please note: I will never become an affiliate partner for a product or service that I don’t use and love! Not all links are affiliates.

 

Baby Heartbeat - Reversible Blanket Crochet Pattern - $3.50 pattern by Ambassador Crochet

Pattern Rating: Beginner – You will need to know basic stitches, but I do offer pattern support for any questions that you may have.

Yarn Used: #4 worsted weight (such as Red Heart Super Saver or Hobby Lobby I Love This Yarn!)

Hook: I/9 (5.50 mm) hook

The following sizes included with the pattern:
Blanket – approx. 30″ square
Hat fits 0-3 months

The pattern link will be emailed to you as soon as payment clears.

 

Happy Crocheting!

Legal Notes: Due to the nature of patterns, this crochet pattern may not be exchanged or returned for a refund. All sales are final. If you have any questions please feel free to contact me. 

You are free to make any of my patterns to sell for profit, but please do not copy and/or redistribute the pattern itself.

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How to Budget for Yarn Purchases

Do you budget for yarn – or does your yarn spending feel out of control at times? Have you put yourself on a yarn diet only to break it after a month? Whether you’re on a limited income, or you’re just ready to cut back on your yarn spending, this post will guide you through some helpful tips so you can get that yarn spending under control.

 

Budget for yarn - Tips on how to stop spending and get spending and get that yarn stash under control.

 

Budget for Yarn Purchases

 

 

If you budget for yarn, kudos to you! But if you’re an impulse yarn shopper (like me) you can end up with a small yarn shop in your basement (like me!) Here are some examples and how they can be avoided.

Scenario 1

 

It’s getting close to Christmas. You “run” to the craft store and buy a ton of yarn because one trip will save you time. You rationalize this by saying you’ll just return whatever you don’t use. Here’s the problem with this scenario. Chances are you’re not going to return the unused yarn….trust me, I know!

Once you’ve spent some time getting prepared for your holiday gift making and you have your to-make list created, then you can start to work on the budgeting process. If you can plan what you’re making ahead of time then you’ll be able to save more than if you just wing it with each gift. Here’s an example: If you’re know you’re going to make scarves for 4 people on your list, consider the following.

Ways to Save

  • Same pattern – Only buy one scarf pattern and use different colors for each recipient. Different color(s) can give something a completely different look.
  • Same yarn – If you are making a scarf for one person and a pair of mittens for the next you may be able to share skeins. If the hat needs 1.5 skeins and and the mittens need half a skein you could use the same yarn and only buy 2 skeins instead of 3.

 

 

Scenario 2

 

You’re working on a project and you run out of the yarn you’re using. Again, you “run” to the craft store for another one. While you’re there you just have to wander the yarn aisles to look at what else they may have (because it’s changed so much in the past week! LOL). While perusing you notice there’s a yarn you’ve never used on sale. You decide to buy 5 skeins because it’s pretty and you’ll find a use for it. Or maybe you just buy one skein so you can test it out and see if you like it. Either way, the majority of the time it ends up sitting in a bucket for a very long time before you find a use for it.

Ways to Save

  • Make a shopping list – Before you leave your house make a list – both brand and color – of the yarn you will be purchasing.
  • Don’t look around – As tempting as it is to browse, don’t do it. It’s temptation and you will ultimately find yourself making a purchase you weren’t planning on making.
  • Purchase online – Don’t even go into the stores. Wait for free shipping coupons and buy your yarn online. You’re less likely to make unplanned purchases.

 

 

Budget for Yarn – Just do it!

 

Either scenario is ultimately a battle of your willpower, but you can do it! With a bit of intentional planning you will end up with far less yarn laying around at the end of the year.

If you have that small yarn store in your basement, and just buy new yarn for projects instead of using what you already have, here are 4 Easy Steps to help you organize your yarn stash.

 

Happy Crocheting!

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Preparing for the Holidays

Holidays – they come from out of nowhere, and they sneak up on us fast – especially if you’re a gift maker. And, if you’re anything like me, you’ll still be crocheting on Christmas Eve. (Please tell me I’m not the only one who does this!) This year it’s time to get it together and create a plan so that you won’t have to do the scramble to finish – or worse, go shopping because you don’t have time to crochet that gift after all.

Preparing for the Holidays - Tips to make sure  you have time for all your gift making this holiday season.

 

 

Goal setting and planning are two things I’ve been working hard on this year. Trying to find more hours in a day so you can do more is great, but it doesn’t work. Being more intentional with your time is what will help you accomplish everything on your to-make list this season.

 

Preparing for the Holidays

 

I mentioned I’m a Christmas Eve crocheter. It never fails! It’s usually my kids’ gifts – they are so very patient with me!  f you’re ready to get organized, creating a plan can help! I’m going to call this a “crochet plan.” It’s kind of like a life plan, or a business plan, because it’ll be directly related to your crochet business/hobby. A good crochet plan will be organized, have priorities, and will give you a clear direction on what needs to be done. So, what do you need to do to make this crochet plan?

 

Let’s Get Organized – Make two lists of gifts you want to make for Christmas. The first one will be a definite list – a list of those that you absolutely want to make something for. The second will be a dream list – a list of people you would love to make something for if you have time. If you also take orders and sell items, make sure you set a cut off date. You will then want to add those items to your list. These lists will serve multiple purposes. Not only will they help you have a visual to keep you on track, but they will help with planning and budgeting for your yarn purchases.

If you have no idea how to keep track of what is going on in your life, get a notebook or planner. I personally use the Erin Condren Life Planner to keep track of business and family to-do’s. Then I use my Your Best Year planner for organizing all my blogging ideas and tasks.

Set Your Priorities – Once you have a list of all the items you want and need to make, put them in order of priority. Are your gifts or your orders more important? Only you can determine that. Are you going to make one list and organize the projects by priority? Or are you going to have 2 separate lists? If you have 2 separate lists, make sure you don’t neglect one while working on the other.

Start Now – Don’t wait until the end of October, or worst Thanksgiving to start working on those projects. Now that you’re organized and you have your list, start now. You’ll set yourself in motion and you’ll be able to keep going through the crazy, hectic holidays.

Revisit Your List Weekly – Planning is great, but if we don’t follow through we’re not making any progress. Revisit your gift/order list at least once a week. The more you remind yourself of what you have set out to do, the more likely you are to finish on time, and maybe even in advance.  

 

Goal Setting

 

To sum up August – it was a crazy whirlwind! Some things got done better than I imagined and other things didn’t get done at all. I’m still sticking with my original plan of writing these goals out and keeping track of them – even if no one else reads them. I committed to this for the entire 2016 year, so bear with me. At the end of the year I want to be able to sit down and truly evaluate not only what worked but also what I need to tweak for next year.

 

 

AUGUST

 

DAILY GOALS:

  1. Personal/Business Development Almost every day!
  2. Review my monthly goal list daily
  3. Track my business income dailyBeen using Lisa Jacob’s “abundance tracker” method. It’s awesome!
  4. Track my personal expenses daily
  5. WorkoutI was consistent until I got a stress fracture in my ankle. 

 

MONTHLY GOALS:

  1. Track income and expenses daily.
  2. Finish creating editorial calendar for 2016.
  3. Create new file/doc for customers (It’s still a secret).
  4. Create 2 new patterns to publish.
    Only 1 published – Openwork Poncho Cowl
  5. Finish and publish 2 unfinished patterns.
  6. Publish 10 blog posts.
    The Design Your Own Crochet Pattern Series was a huge success!
  7. Spend 10-15 min/3x day on social media growth.
    Growth Goals:
    Blog Newsletter – 1,245 to 1,300 – 1,258 
    Facebook – 6,918 – 7K – 6,929
    Pinterest – 6,094 to 7k – 6,474
    Twitter – 638 – 700 – 651
    Instagram – 245 – 300 – 272
  8. Stay on track with the goals that I made in YBY planner.
    I haven’t been 100% on target but I’m making huge strides in my progress.
  9. Create new chore chart for my kids.
  10. Finish unpacking.

My #1 priority for August is tracking expenses and income daily – both personal and business.

 

What worked – My blog series. It helped so much to have an editorial calendar all planned out so I could just sit down and write instead of trying to come up with things daily to blog about.

What didn’t work – I pretty much bombed this month on my list. I know it was mostly because I had a tech edit that took longer than expected, plus I had a huge afghan project I was working on finishing. Those 2 things held me back from accomplishing the other things.

 

SEPTEMBER

DAILY GOALS:

  1. Personal/Business Development
  2. Review my monthly goal list daily
  3. Track my business income daily
  4. Track my personal expenses daily
  5. Workout (limited until I go back for my orthopedic followup at the end of the month)

 

MONTHLY GOALS:

  1. Track income and expenses daily.
  2. Finish creating editorial calendar for 2016.
  3. Make my holiday t0-make list.
  4. Create holiday budget checklist.
  5. Create 2 new patterns to publish.
  6. Finish and publish 2 unfinished patterns.
  7. Publish 8 blog posts.
  8. Spend 10-15 min/3x day on social media growth.
    Growth Goals:
    Blog Newsletter – 1,258 to 1,300
    Facebook – 6,929 – 7K
    Pinterest – 6,474 to 7k
    Twitter – 651 – 700
    Instagram – 272 – 300
  9. Stay on track with the goals that I made in YBY planner.
  10. Create block schedule for work/family/homeschool.

My #1 priority for Sept is tracking expenses and income daily – both personal and business.

 

In addition to the above, is there anything else you do to plan your gift making? Now is a great time to put one in place before the holidays creep up on us. Simply put, it’s time to make that plan and then take action!

 

Happy Crocheting!

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Tips for Designing Your First Pattern

Designing your first pattern can be overwhelming but with a few simple pointers it doesn’t have to be. It’s time to look at your pattern from a different perspective and shed a whole new light on the subject. Let’s look at 3 tips that will help you get started on writing a clear, easy to read pattern.

 

Designing Your Own Crochet Pattern Series - Tips for Designing Your First Pattern

 

Welcome to Part 10 – the final post in the “Designing Your Own Crochet Pattern” Series. This series guides you from the basics of designing your first crochet pattern to the actual writing process, and includes everything in between. If you are just joining us and would like to start at the beginning, read Part 1 – the 6 Basic Steps of the Design Process. There was so much information packed into this series you don’t want to miss any of it.

 

Tips for Designing Your First Pattern

 

Working behind the scenes as a tech editor, I have learned many things about the design process and what it takes to make a pattern clear and concise for a crocheter. I want to share with you some of the things I have learned along the way. These are important to think about not only with your first pattern but with all the patterns you write. I recommend you apply the following tips to each and every pattern you write. If you can do that you will have success.

 

Pay attention to other designers’ patterns.

 

Are there designers’ patterns that you find extremely difficult to read? I think everyone has run into at least one pattern that they found difficult to follow. Of course there are also those patterns that are uniquely easy to read. Take both of these patterns and learn from them. What drives you crazy about a certain pattern? Don’t repeat that mistake. What makes you love a certain pattern? (ex: st counts at the end of rows) Use that! Look at your own experiences reading pattern and use the positive and negative to shape what you want yours to look like.

 

Use Standard Crochet Terms.

 

The Craft Yarn Council of American has industry standards in place for a reason. Please use them. I think all their standards are extremely important, but especially the use of abbreviations. Don’t try to be creative by coming up with your own abbreviations, style, etc. just to be original or have your patterns stand out. Generally speaking, it’s just frustrating not to mention confusing to the crocheter.

 

Don’t assume anything.

 

Write every pattern as if someone has never crocheted before and you’re trying to explain to them what to do. To you this may sound too basic but trust me when I say, it’s not. Generally speaking, if you write it for a beginner you can’t go wrong. I once did a tech edit for a pattern and it started off with, “Start crocheting as you always do.” That’s a perfect example of what not to do! The pattern was a beginner pattern, so “start as you always do” doesn’t fly. As a matter of fact, don’t write something like that for an intermediate or experienced pattern either. It’s not always possible, but try to write in the most basic form so that anyone can understand it, no matter what their skill level. Think of it from the readers perspective.

 

All of the above are equally important to the success of a well written pattern. Not only do they help the crocheter, but they make your life easier when writing the pattern as well as answering questions about the pattern.

Are you ready to dive in and design your first pattern? It will be exciting and scary all at the same time but the biggest thing to remember is to be thorough. Whether you need some help getting started, or you want to make sure you’ve covered everything, my Style Guide & Pattern Template will guide you through the basics.

 

Design Your Own Crochet Pattern - Style Guide & Pattern Template

Click to purchase Style Guide & Pattern Template – $1.00

 

For more on this series, read:

Part 1 – 6 Basic Steps of the Design Process
Part 2 – Finding the Perfect Design Ideas
Part 3 – Finding Your Designing Niche
Part 4 – Creating Your Brand
Part 5 – Steps to Publishing Your Crochet Pattern
Part 6 – Basic Copyright for Crocheters
Part 7 – Should You Charge for Patterns? The Free vs. Paid Dilemma
Part 8 – The 3 P’s of a Professional Crochet Designer
Part 9 – How to Find Your Writing Style

 

Happy Designing!

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How to Find Your Writing Style

I’m sure you’ve noticed that each designer has a slightly different writing style for their patterns. Most of these subtleties go unnoticed, but some are obvious to crocheters. One of the most obvious ones – stitch counts are included at the end of each row/round. Below are a few of the basic things to consider when writing your pattern.

 

Designing Your Own Crochet Pattern Series - Find Your Writing Style

 

Welcome to Part 9 of the “Designing Your Own Crochet Pattern” Series. This series will guide you through the basics of crochet pattern design. If you are just joining us and would like to start at the beginning, read Part 1 – the 6 Basic Steps of the Design Process. Even if you have no desire to be a designer, you can still benefit from this series.

Find Your Writing Style

 

Writing a pattern doesn’t have to be super hard but you should make sure you include all the info that a crocheter could possibly need. I would rather give a crocheter too much info than not enough. Every designer should use a template. It doesn’t have to be a fancy template, but it should be set up so that all you’ll have to do is plug in your info and add the pattern. A good template will help you do the following 3 things.

  • Be thorough – Make sure your layout has everything you could possibly need to add. After all, you don’t want to forget things like gauge, special stitches, hook size, etc.
  • Be consistent – When you always use the same layout it looks more professional, crocheters will know what to expect, and you will have a greater chance of return customers.
  • Be professional – When you use a standard template it gives your patterns the same layout and customers will know what to expect. Plus, it just looks better.

 

A Writing Style that Works for You

 

There are many ways you can go about setting up a template. I use a basic template for my patterns and then add or remove any sections that don’t pertain to that specific pattern. Take some time to find a style that fits your brand. One that works best for you will make all the difference in your writing style not to mention your customers will be happy.

 

For more on this series, read:

Part 1 – 6 Basic Steps of the Design Process
Part 2 – Finding the Perfect Design Ideas
Part 3 – Finding Your Designing Niche
Part 4 – Creating Your Brand
Part 5 – Steps to Publishing Your Crochet Pattern
Part 6 – Basic Copyright for Crocheters
Part 7 – Should You Charge for Patterns? The Free vs. Paid Dilemma
Part 8 – The 3 P’s of a Professional Crochet Designer

 

Happy Designing!

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The 3 P’s of a Professional Crochet Designer

I’m going to go out on a limb here when I say that there is a difference between a crochet designer and a professional crochet designer. One word can make a huge difference and that word is professional. The word professional when used as an adjective (as I did in my title) means “following an occupation as a means of livelihood.” Someone who is designing patterns as part of their livelihood or using it for income is a professional. But if you’re going to be a professional there are certain things that you should be doing to make sure you’re also acting the part.

 

Designing Your Own Crochet Pattern Series - The 3 P's of a Professional Crochet Designer

 

Welcome to Part 8 of the “Designing Your Own Crochet Pattern” Series. This series will guide you through the basics of crochet pattern design. If you are just joining us and would like to start at the beginning, read Part 1 – the 6 Basic Steps of the Design Process. Even if you have no desire to be a designer, you can still benefit from this series.

 

The 3 P’s of a Professional
Crochet Designer

 

 

Process – Make a process that works for you. Don’t try to follow someone else’s lead. Be your own original.

Product – Don’t skip any steps. Have someone test your pattern and even have a tech editor look at it before you publish it. You want your patterns to be as close to perfect as they can be when your customers purchase them.

People – In addition to your patterns, please don’t forget about your customers. People are the most important thing, no matter what! In fact, I believe that customer service is a key element. I can’t tell you how many emails I get asking for pattern help because the designer they purchased a pattern from doesn’t return their requests for help. Respond to emails and be polite in your replies even if your customers seem rude or belligerent.

 

Be a Professional Crochet Designer

 

Almost anyone can design a crochet pattern but you should want your work and your patterns to stand out above the rest. Acting like a professional is a good way to put your customers first so you will have happy, returning customers.

 

For more on this series, read:

Part 1 – 6 Basic Steps of the Design Process
Part 2 – Finding the Perfect Design Ideas
Part 3 – Finding Your Designing Niche
Part 4 – Creating Your Brand
Part 5 – Steps to Publishing Your Crochet Pattern
Part 6 – Basic Copyright for Crocheters
Part 7 – Should You Charge for Patterns? The Free vs. Paid Dilemma

 

Happy Designing!

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